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Digital Mapping Projects


Oxford Outremer Map Project

Project Manager: Dr. Laura Morreale
Project Editor and Supervising Scholar: Dr. Nicholas Paul

The Oxford Outremer Map Project utilizes digital tools and the open global forum of the internet to bring to light a neglected medieval intellectual and cultural artifact.  The map was made or copied by an English monk named Matthew Paris who died in 1259.  Colors from two paintings on the reverse of the map have bled through, making it difficult to see Matthew's drawings, labels, and notes.

This collaborative project created by faculty, graduate students, and visiting fellows at the Center for Medieval Studies produces a clearer image of the map to facillitate its study and gathers information about the represented places in a database.  Essays introduce the interactive map and explain how the project approached different kinds of spatial information.  The project also offers teaching modules on medieval cartography.

 

The French of Italy TimeMap

Project Manager: Dr. Laura Morreale

The French of Italy TimeMap incorporates textual, geographic, and temporal data to plot the production of French-language texts in Italy spatially and chronographically.  Mapped points link to our French of Italy database to supplement the geo-temporal visualization with bibliographical and explanatory pages on the corpus.  By inviting users to interact with the data about medieval literary production across Italy in the form of map-reading, the project reveals a larger picture of this moment in literary history than has previously been afforded by national philological traditions.

 

Exploring Place in the French of Italy

Project Manager: Dr. Laura Morreale
Visualization and Data Collection Lead; Contributing Author: Heather V. Hill

Exploring Place in the French of Italy maps place-names mentioned in a selection of medieval French-language works created or copied on the Italian peninsula from roughly 1250 to 1500.  These sixteen texts are featured on Fordham's French of Italy website.

Mapping place-names provides a view of the texts that varies from more traditional approaches, which often focus on close reading or the examination of one particular textual tradition over time. Exploring these texts together from a geographical vantage point is especially appropriate for the French of Italy corpus, where the choice of a non-native languageFrench instead of Latin or a local Italian dialectinvites comparative and contextual analysis. Exploring Place in the French of Italy provides a way of understanding the places medieval Italians described and imagined when they chose to write in French.

Essays and a downloadable datasheet accompany the map to highlight the theoretical questions it elicits and to encourage further research.